Category Archives: Fantasy

The One About David Bowie

I ask for so little. Just fear me, love me, do as I say and I will be your slave.

Ah, yesterday the King of the Misfits’ returned to the stars.

Today I have regained the ability to form sentences to some degree. Grief sometimes makes no sense. We were not friends. My daily routine is not affected in any way by the loss of this icon. My husband is still here. My children are still here. I am in relative health. So it would make sense that my seven-year-old son should ask me why I am crying.

“There is nothing upsetting happening right now…” he claims with some puzzlement.

You are right. It’s just a reminder. That is all.

A reminder that sometimes a person can be touched by a moment, something that can change a person, get in deep and under the skin, becoming part of who you are from that day forward. Art in many forms can transfer that meaning between people who have never met, and who never will. It is for such a moment that I want to remember you by, Mr. Jones.

I remember sitting in my high school bedroom, listening to the borrowed vinyl “Space Oddity” being mesmerized by the sadness of the lyrics as if he were speaking directly to me. Just coming out of the super saccharine sugary lyrics of 80’s pop radio, and not yet cresting the cultural horizon into the 90’s grunge scene, I began to realize that there is sadness, there is heartache, there is that strange weakness within us to sometimes want to take that step from the safety of one’s tin can, to float in a most peculiar way. And that sometimes feeling that way was okay…  

But that is not the moment.

There are people in the world who seem to be born to performance, who hold within them a spark, a light which draws to them the eyes of every person in the room. Call it charisma, charm, beauty, inner light. Whatever it was you had it. Through the course of your career you embodied the ageless, the magical, as you did playing the iconic Goblin King in the movie Labyrinth.

For anyone living under a rock since 1986, “Labyrinth” is a magical tale of a young girl who accidentally wishes away her baby brother to the realm of the Goblin King. He appears and commands her that she must solve the imposing maze to save her brother, or the baby will become one of his goblins forever.

But the Evil King was no monster. Your performance of Jareth embodied everything that could tempt a young girl into turning away from her task at hand. You were beautiful, brimming with power, magic, glamour, pretty boubles, sparkling enchantments, the promise of castles, dresses, eternal devotion. And then…

And then…

You became defeated by an ordinary girl.

sara

This was a benchmark moment for all of us ordinary girls watching, when Sara uttered those now famous words, “You have no power over me!”

It made a difference that you were so dynamic, so magical, so charismatic, so powerful, so strong…

But Sara was stronger. And becouse of that moment we all became stronger. And the defeat in your eyes as she spoke those words, breaking the spell. We knew it was true.

db with globe

If Jareth had been played by any other actor it just would not have worked. Anyone else would have come across as just a man wearing eyeliner and a wig, but you, sir. You stepped into it, as you did with every character making it fully realized. You brought with it every nuance and beat, the bricks which build a performance. You never hesitated.

You became the Goblin King. Larger than life.

And for that I thank you… Rest well, Starman. Until we meet again.

david with cig

 

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Movie Review: Thale (2012)

Thale (2012)_00

In an effort to expand the influence of our media input we stumbled across a little gem on Netflix, the 2012 Norwegian Thriller, Thale. We were first introduced to the joys of Norwegian Independent film a couple of years ago when we watched the runaway thriller, Troll Hunter. If you have not seen that one yet, go see it. Now. Since we had so thoroughly enjoyed the first we decided to check this one out. Thale did not disappoint in any way. So far Norwegian films are two for two, so thumbs up to Norway. (No seriously. We want to check out more films from there, so if you know of any good ones, leave it in the comments for us.)

At the beginning of the film we are introduced to Elvis and Leo, two members of a crime scene clean up crew. Things get gruesome early on. Fair warning for the squeamish. Leo is the senior of the two and it is established fairly early that Elvis is filling in for someone else and this is not his usual assignment. When they arrived at a cabin in the middle of the woods to collect the remains of the deceased, they discover a series of evidence that unravels more questions than answers. Starting with the discovery of a hidden underground bunker the two men stumble across a collection of old canned goods, stacks of medical dictionaries and a mysterious young woman hidden within.

I don’t want to give too much away, but the movie is impressive on multiple levels. We were instantly hooked, and the themes ranged from delving into Norwegian Folklore (quite heavily), to the two men dealing with their own personal issues threaded throughout the film. One of the reasons I have always loved indie films is that the filmmakers have little to work with and must choose where they want their talents to shine. Thale is no exception. Set in a small underground setting the film captures the claustrophobic feel that the characters must be experiencing, the tedium, anxiety and confusion of Elvis and Leo is undeniably felt by the viewer, but it is the character of Thale that is the true prize of the film evoking both sympathy, mystery and terror.

thale2

The title character is played in brilliant form by the mesmerizing Silje Reinamo. What struck me the most about her performance is how much she says without saying a word. Traumatized by her ordeal she remains for the most part mute throughout, unable to share her story with the two men who find her. Just about every scene that she is in she demands the centrality of the movie with just her presence and expression. She is for the most part of the film, silent, naked and outnumbered, but not for a moment did the filmmakers treat her as anything less than a powerful entity in her own right. Watching her made me have one of those moments in which I wanted to fall into the movie and give myself completely to the story. Unfortunately I could not help but wonder if the film were to become Americanized or remade, how would they go about ruining it, sexualizing the character and making her a victim. In this film Thale is anything but. I shall spare the readers my internal rant.

There is a good bit of nudity but no sexual scenario whatsoever. Filmed in Norway the movie does contain subtitles, but most of the best movies have subtitles anyway. There are some elements of subtle humor. At one point I felt like Elvis was having a Dante moment reminiscent of Clerks. (“I’m not even supposed to BE here today!”) So if you like foreign films, films with strong female characters, Indie films, Fantasy Thrillers with a little bit of mystery, have a look at Thale. You will not be disappointed.

Overall I give Thale a solid 9 out of 10 popcorn boxes.